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won this election by a 50-48% margin. that may go up to around off 51-48 when california comes in california's last time to wipe weeks to count its votes. account with five cars in brazil but i'm not sure what california is so much less technologically advanced. but there we are. for all these figures are necessarily a little incomplete as they apply to the nation. there's some other states with votes still out, too. it appears that obama will get a huge electoral vote advantage out of this relatively narrow popular vote margin. assuming he carries florida what he is in current counts ahead in the miami-dade county, people are this year counting votes without the assistance of many republican and democratic lawyers. with florida commit electoral vote, 332-206. bush was a 51-40 margin in 2004 only got 286 votes. obama was slightly less it appeared, gets 332. i think there's a certain structural demographic advantage for democrats in the electoral college in this era. democratic voters tend to be clustered in something large metropolitan areas, and in particular neighborhoods, an
that will work well in your commies to mourn for the california when you are making baskets. .. this city is so complicated. that trying to understand it is too hard for a small group of kind of centrally located planners to ever fully be able to do. and so the way the markets work as they say look, no individual person has to understand the whole thing. the market works because every individual in the market understands just a little bit of it. you can focus on your part i am selling, creating, sharing. and your part of the world, and over all the totality of all these agents in the marketplace will end up coming up with new solutions, problems, meeting people's needs and so when. so markets are a kind of peer network in that sense. where the.ditional progressives differ from traditional libertarians is that we don't think that markets solve every problem in society. there are many human experience that are not necessarily solvedc by markets but in five markets create their own problems sometimes. they create bubbles forntervet instance. there's a lote of companies thaa were trying to build a
to happen. nancy pelosi is in california. her home, in name pa valley -- napa valley, was broken into on monday. so she actually has some literal housekeeping to take care of. they don't know what is missing and sort of this bizarre thing. now, in the event that she does retire or resign from congress, steny hoyer would be the front runner to take over as minority leader. the sort of subtext, it's almost a shakespearian subtext between hoyer and pelosi. they interned together on capitol hill in the 1960s, and they've been rivals for years, most poignantly in the last 10, 12 years as they competed for leadership positions in the democratic caucus. hoyer would very much like to be minority leader, and he would make a bid. the question now is whether pelosi is maneuvering, is trying to line up somebody who would be her successor of chose. so there's a lot of drama. >> and just rattle off, if you would, who is in that next generation of would-be party leaders who would like to have pelosi's endorsement, or even if they don't, would like to move up? >> the -- right now outside of hoye
are not an outlet. we are program at the university of california berkeley as a graduate program that does reporting, but working with different organizations. we don't have an initiative per se. there are organizations that are doing incredible work with citizens. the guardian u.k. is the best example of a large news organization that works with citizens on huge scale. one thing they did in the last couple years was to pull public records about the way their politicians were spending money. they created kind of a forum. citizens volunteered to go through millions of documents and they competed, it was amazingly successful. don't know how many people participated but it was a lot. the guardian is very innovative and probably less squeamish at trying to find ways to engage citizens. i will save for us we don't get a lot of tips, but we never -- don't know of journalists are experienced but never ignore. i don't know how crazy it seems, how nonsensical it seems, how far fetched about aliens, we follow up on every single tip and you will be surprised how many stories actually we get out of those tips,
university of california san diego, certificate in music and political philosophy from the university and soviet armenia, and his doctorate in international relations from oxford university what he was a marshall scholar. to my any of his richard solomon who is the assistant of state for for east asia and pacific affairs in 1989-1982 for president george h. w. bush. he served as president of united states institute of peace since 1993 during which time he oversaw its growth into a center of international conflict management analysis in applied programs. during his service in government doctor solomon negotiate the cambodia peace treaty, the first united nations permanent peacemaking agreement, a leading role in a dialogue commission issues between the united states and the koreans. helped establish aipac, the asia-pacific economic cooperation initiative ambiguous negotiations, japan, mongolia and vietnam on important bilateral issues. in 1992-93, doctor solomon shoulda susan glasser to the philippines recorded the closure of the u.s. naval bases and the new framework bilateral and reg
of this nation. and it holds true to all americans. from the migrant worker in california to the students here in this room and executives in new york city, we all cherish liberty. and i can't help but to feel we are among the greatest generation. [inaudible] we hold the world at our fingertips and we can change the world at the blink of an eye. to the innovation of social media we have brought the world closer together, and we've brought stories shared among all individuals. i have come to realize after having my article published in an online magazine, that to me proves to me that we do have a future. we must take full of vantage of our time in history. this is why i'm so honored to host the debate tonight with three speakers of three different perspectives and political ideology. i truly believe the discussions among these different perspectives and opinions can pay for which he american dream. all of our paths here for many years. today, we will write of our own future, our own destiny. i can't think of any better person to lead a debate more eloquently, efficiently, equally, and as an ind
contact the jewish -- in oakland, california, perhaps their program could be a catalyst for peaceful future to is real and palestine. >> well, i'll have a look at the. if he gives me the details, he's looking rather mischievous about this. probably not what it entails but i will as always give due care and attention to his ideas. >> what particular discussions has the foreign secretary held with secretary clinton over egypt's role in brokering a comprehensive cease-fire agreement with the situation? mighty deal with issues such as border crossings and entries between gaza and egypt which would help reduce gaza's economic dependence upon israel? >> yes, we are in close hopes with unisys, having very regular discussion with secretary clinton and will be having another one very shortly. the wider solution for gaza, not just an immediate
if the democrats because they could turn their state into greece or california. >> we are in washington and the wording goes back to 86, right? >> yes. part of passing the 86 bill. we did as americans for tax reform. >> the wording, except a few numbers, the wording of the pledge hasn't changed. in 1986 when people first sign that pledge, the federal budget deficit was 220 billion. this year is 1.1 trillion. how can you say nothing has changed across lots of things have changed if we elect, for so we elected bush to focus not on spending. look, people vastly between the pledge or creates all the worst problems and a fledgling does certain things. the pledge makes tax increases more difficult at the state level and at the national level. we haven't had republican vote for an income tax since 1990 when bush did and threw away his presidency. and 93 tax increase which has only a democratic votes and there were no tax increases until 2009 when obama came in and raise taxes with democrats. >> republican's line. isn't this a bit -- you were having republicans takes a very difficult pledge to
resulted in these personnel actions. >> thank you. yield back. >> the gentleman from california is recognized for five minutes. >> thank you, mr. chairman. i find this hearing amazing. because what we need to do is to work together to solve a problem. and make sure it will never happen again. instead, what i hear from my republican colleagues is they want to prosecute the director of the food and drug administration. did she know this? what actions did she take? it sounds like massachusetts has a lot to be apologetic about. isn't that a fair statement, dr. smith? >> that's right. >> the question is, did fda failed to do things they should have done? well, sounds like you could have done more. the fda is an institution could do more. the first time they wrote a letter wasn't 2006, saying that this thing seemed to become this company seem to be out of control. and then they didn't do anything after that. i have a feeling, dr. hamburg, you are being picked on because you're part of the obama administration, and republicans have been picking on obama for four years. and usually thei
feet west, used to be 500 feet west and you can't hear me quoting tongue-in-cheek saying california climatologist who once said something is happening here, just what it isn't exactly clear. .. >> i just want to say that the citizens of new york are so lucky of to have you and senator schumer and others just carrying the weight of superstorm sandy so that we can fix this and do some mitigation so we don't see this again. >> welshing thank you, madam -- welshing thank you, madam chairwoman, for holding this today. i can't tell you how important it is for the congress to understand the predth and depth of this storm and what impact it's actually had. i also appreciate your kind words and your call in the middle of the storm giving the condolences for the victims and for the families that were suffering. i also want to thank my colleagues who will be appearing later in this hearing, senator schumer will come in, and the rest of our delegation will come in this as well. i just want to thank you for giving us the opportunities to tell the stories of what's happened to our families in new
him during the 2012 u.s. campaign. he was campaign manager for the landslide reelection of california governor in 2006. before that a top political advice sor in the white house of george w. bush. he attended the university of delaware from 1988 to 1993. david plouffe crossed paths in schmidt in the late 1980's. he completed his political seasons degree and finned two years ago. he has completed two presidential bids. he was appointed as a senior advice sor to the president in the white house in 2011. he attended is the marks high school before serving in a wide viret of state and national political campaigns. i'm going to ask the two speakers this evening to speak and i had to decide who is going to go first and i decided to use a standard that anyone this this audience could mean and that is whoever has won the most recent presidential election gets to speak first. i think that's the fair enough thing to do so please welcome david plouffe and steve schmidt to the university of delaware. [applause] >> thank you for joining thus evening. it's great to be back where steve and i had our
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11